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Diverse research project connects Belmont third-graders to the world

The reasons for students choosing a country were as diverse as the countries that students presented on recently in Daisy Shada’s third-grade class at Belmont Elementary School.

“I wanted to research about North America first. I chose to do the Bahamas because it looks like a very interesting place,” said Graidys.

“I used to know a lot about (Brazil), but I really wanted to research it again so I could get more facts about it,” Andrew said.

Liam opened his presentation with, “I researched about Japan because I thought it was very interesting.”

“I chose Turkey because I never knew about Turkey but I wanted to research about it,” said Eveline.

“So, I picked Jordan because I was born there,” exclaimed Abdullah.

The research project was completed during writing time in the sixth week review. Shada said the class picked one of the essential reading questions - how do cultures contribute to a community? Using Culturegrams through the Belmont media center website, the topics students researched and presented on included schools, games and sports, foods and holidays.

“They put a list together of Google Slides of anything that they could learn that was similar and different to our culture in the U.S.,” Shada said.

With this project, students met third-grade state reading standards on learning about an essential question and connecting it to learning and writing. This also tied into social studies state standards on learning about different areas of the United States and the world, and typing curriculum.

Shada added, “I just want them to recognize that we’re all diverse and we come from all different backgrounds, and I want them to immerse in that.”

Students in the class found they had some things in common with the countries and cultures they presented on.

Abdullah shared with the class what he liked: “Sometimes for lunch they eat mahshi...and meshwi, shish kebab. I still eat them.”

Liam offered his own connection to the class: “Sushi and rice are popular food in Japan. They also eat ramen. Fun fact, ramen is my favorite food.”

Graidys said after the presentation, “I learned during this project that there are a lot of unique cultures and each one is special. I was a little nervous, but I was really proud of myself at the end when people clapped.”


Published: October 9, 2018, Updated: October 26, 2018

“I just want them to recognize that we’re all diverse and we come from all different backgrounds, and I want them to immerse in that.”

Daisy Shada, Belmont Elementary School third grade teacher